Experts: At best, snakebite kits don’t work; at worst, they delay care (Dr. Mazda Shirazi)

March 27, 2015

Cronkite News
Thursday, 3/26/2015
TUCSON – For those heading into rattlesnake territory, a snakebite kit – often featuring an illustration of a viper ready to strike – may seem to offer a measure of safety. But experts say treating a bite by cutting tissue, using a suction cup in hopes of drawing out venom with the blood and tying a cord in hopes of keeping the venom out of the lymphatic system can do more harm than good. F. Mazda Shirazi, a University of Arizona associate professor and medical director at the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center, said people who use snakebite kits sometimes wind up seeking medical attention too late. Read the whole story and see the video.

Cronkite News
Thursday, 3/26/2015
TUCSON – For those heading into rattlesnake territory, a snakebite kit – often featuring an illustration of a viper ready to strike – may seem to offer a measure of safety. But experts say treating a bite by cutting tissue, using a suction cup in hopes of drawing out venom with the blood and tying a cord in hopes of keeping the venom out of the lymphatic system can do more harm than good. F. Mazda Shirazi, a University of Arizona associate professor and medical director at the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center, said people who use snakebite kits sometimes wind up seeking medical attention too late. Read the whole story and see the video.