The Impact of a Soiled Airway on Intubation Success in the Emergency Department when using the GlideScope or the Direct Laryngoscope.

TitleThe Impact of a Soiled Airway on Intubation Success in the Emergency Department when using the GlideScope or the Direct Laryngoscope.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsSakles JC, G Corn J, Hollinger P, Arcaris B, Patanwala AE, Mosier JM
JournalAcad Emerg Med
Date Published2017 Jan 20
ISSN Number1553-2712
Abstract

BACKGROUND: To determine the impact of a soiled airway on first pass success when using the GlideScope video laryngoscope or the direct laryngoscope for intubation in the emergency department.

METHODS: Data were prospectively collected on all patients intubated in an academic emergency department from July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2016. Patients ≥18 years of age, who underwent rapid sequence intubation with the GlideScope or the direct laryngoscope were included in the analysis. Data were stratified by device used (GlideScope or direct laryngoscope). The primary outcome was first pass success. Patients were categorized as those without blood or vomitus (CLEAN) and those with blood or vomitus (SOILED) in their airway. Multivariate regression models were developed to control for confounders.

RESULTS: When using the GlideScope the first pass success was lower in the SOILED group (249/306; 81.4%) than the in CLEAN group (586/644; 91.0%) (difference 9.6%; 95% CI: 4.7 to 14.5). Similarly, when using the direct laryngoscope, the first pass success was lower in the SOILED group (186/284; 65.5%) than in the CLEAN group (569/751; 75.8%) (difference 10.3%; 95% CI: 4.0 to 16.6). The SOILED airway was associated with a decreased first pass success in both the GlideScope cohort (aOR 0.4; 95% CI: 0.3 to 0.6) and the direct laryngoscope cohort (aOR 0.6; 95% CI: 0.5 to 0.8).

CONCLUSION: Soiling of the airway was associated with a reduced first pass success during emergency intubation and this reduction occurred to a similar degree whether using either the GlideScope or the direct laryngoscope. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

DOI10.1111/acem.13160
Alternate JournalAcad Emerg Med
PubMed ID28109012
Faculty Reference: 
Jarrod Mosier, MD
John C. Sakles, MD