Emergency medicine resident crisis resource management ability: a simulation-based longitudinal study.

TitleEmergency medicine resident crisis resource management ability: a simulation-based longitudinal study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsClarke S, Horeczko T, Carlisle M, Barton JD, Ng V, Al-Somali S, Bair AE
JournalMed Educ Online
Volume19
Pagination25771
Date Published2014
ISSN Number1087-2981
KeywordsAcademic Medical Centers, Adult, California, Education, Medical, Graduate, Emergency Medicine, Female, Health Resources, Humans, Internship and Residency, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Professional Competence
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Simulation has been identified as a means of assessing resident physicians' mastery of technical skills, but there is a lack of evidence for its utility in longitudinal assessments of residents' non-technical clinical abilities. We evaluated the growth of crisis resource management (CRM) skills in the simulation setting using a validated tool, the Ottawa Crisis Resource Management Global Rating Scale (Ottawa GRS). We hypothesized that the Ottawa GRS would reflect progressive growth of CRM ability throughout residency.

METHODS: Forty-five emergency medicine residents were tracked with annual simulation assessments between 2006 and 2011. We used mixed-methods repeated-measures regression analyses to evaluate elements of the Ottawa GRS by level of training to predict performance growth throughout a 3-year residency.

RESULTS: Ottawa GRS scores increased over time, and the domains of leadership, problem solving, and resource utilization, in particular, were predictive of overall performance. There was a significant gain in all Ottawa GRS components between postgraduate years 1 and 2, but no significant difference in GRS performance between years 2 and 3.

CONCLUSIONS: In summary, CRM skills are progressive abilities, and simulation is a useful modality for tracking their development. Modification of this tool may be needed to assess advanced learners' gains in performance.

DOI10.3402/meo.v19.25771
Alternate JournalMed Educ Online
PubMed ID25499769
PubMed Central IDPMC4262767
Faculty Reference: 
Vivienne Ng, MD, MPH