Comparison of the reusable standard GlideScope® video laryngoscope and the disposable cobalt GlideScope® video laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in an academic emergency department: a retrospective review.

TitleComparison of the reusable standard GlideScope® video laryngoscope and the disposable cobalt GlideScope® video laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in an academic emergency department: a retrospective review.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsSakles JC, Patanwala AE, Mosier J, Dicken J, Holman N
JournalAcad Emerg Med
Volume21
Issue4
Pagination408-15
Date Published2014 Apr
ISSN Number1553-2712
KeywordsAcademic Medical Centers, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Disposable Equipment, Emergency Service, Hospital, Female, Humans, Intubation, Intratracheal, Laryngoscopes, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Retrospective Studies, Young Adult
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The objective was to compare the first-pass success and clinical performance characteristics of the reusable standard GlideScope® video laryngoscope (sGVL) and the disposable Cobalt GlideScope® video laryngoscope (cGVL).

METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data recorded into a continuous quality improvement database at an urban academic emergency department (ED). The intent of the database is to evaluate operator performance and to track practice patterns used for intubation in the ED. Between July 1, 2007, and June 30, 2013, operators recorded all consecutive intubations performed in the ED. The database included patient demographics and detailed information about each intubation, such as device(s) used, reason for device selection, method of intubation, difficult airway characteristics, number of intubation attempts, and outcome of each attempt. The operator also evaluated the presence of lens fogging and extent of lens contamination. The primary outcome measure was first-pass success. Secondary outcome measures were ultimate success, Cormack-Lehane (CL) view of the airway, presence of lens fogging, and extent of lens contamination. Only adult patients age 18 years or older intubated with the sGVL or cGVL using a stylet, and who had data forms completed at the time of intubation, were included in this study.

RESULTS: A total of 583 intubations were included in the study, 504 with the sGVL and 79 with cGVL. First pass success was achieved in 81.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]=77.3% to 84.3%) of patients in the sGVL group and in 58.2% (95% CI=46.6% to 69.2%) of patients in the cGVL group. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, the sGVL was associated with a higher first pass success than the cGVL (odds ratio [OR]=3.3, 95% CI=1.9 to 5.8). The ultimate success of the sGVL was 92.1% (95% CI=89.4% to 94.3%) and the cGVL was 72.2% (95% CI=60.9% to 81.7%). A CL grade I or II view was obtained in 93.2% (95% CI=90.7% to 95.3%) in the sGVL group and 86.1% (95% CI=76.5% to 92.8%) in the cGVL group. Lens fogging occurred in 33.3% (95% CI=29.2% to 37.6%) of the cases in the sGVL group and 59.5% (95% CI=47.9% to 70.4%) of the cases in the cGVL group. Significant lens contamination occurred in 5.0% (95% CI=3.2% to 7.2%) of the sGVL group and 21.5% (95% CI=13.1% to 32.2%) of the cGVL group.

CONCLUSIONS: In this observational study, the sGVL had higher first pass and overall success than the disposable cGVL. The cGVL had significantly higher incidence of lens fogging and contamination, which may partially account for its lower success. A prospective randomized trial is needed to confirm these findings.

DOI10.1111/acem.12351
Alternate JournalAcad Emerg Med
PubMed ID24730403
Faculty Reference: 
Jarrod Mosier, MD
John C. Sakles, MD