Comparison of knowledge, perception and attitudes of concussion in previously concussed versus non-concussed youth soccer players.

TitleComparison of knowledge, perception and attitudes of concussion in previously concussed versus non-concussed youth soccer players.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsMyrdal CN, Huang S, Beach HN, Waterbrook AL
JournalPhys Sportsmed
Date Published2017 Jun 21
ISSN Number2326-3660
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine if history of concussion is correlated with a difference in knowledge, attitude, and perception of concussive injuries in youth soccer players.

METHODS: A convenience sample of youth soccer athletes aged 14 to 18 years completed a survey assessing prior history of concussive injury, knowledge of concussive injury, self-reporting attitudes, and perception of the injury. The survey consists of 16 knowledge questions (eleven on a scale of 1-2, and five on a scale of 1-4) and 12 attitude questions (seven on a scale of 1-4, and five on a scale of 1-5). The primary outcomes are the total scores calculated by summing the standardized raw scores for all knowledge questions and attitude questions, respectively. Linear regression was used to estimate the mean difference in the primary outcomes between previously concussed and non-concussed athletes (calculated as previously concussed - non-concussed).

RESULTS: Surveys were obtained from 90 athletes, with 32 (36%) previously sustaining at least one concussion. Thirty-one out of these 32 concussions were diagnosed by a medical provider. On average, the mean total raw scores of all knowledge questions are 34.6 (82.2% of 42 possible points) and 33.7 (80.2% of 42 total points) for previously concussed and non-concussed athletes, respectively, and the mean total raw scores of all attitude questions are 38.7 (72.9% of 53 possible points) and 39.6 (74.7% of 53 possible points), respectively. Mean differences estimated from univariate linear regression in the standardized total scores of knowledge questions and attitude questions are 1.56(95% confidence interval: -1.52-4.65) and -1.23 (%95 confidence interval: -4.64-2.19), respectively. Adjusting for age and years of playing soccer gave similar results.

CONCLUSIONS: Although we did not find significant differences between previously concussed and non-concussed athletes in either the knowledge or the attitude questions as measured by their total scores, this study showed a high level of awareness of concussion in youth soccer players, while still highlighting a need for education. Limited distinctions were made among subgroups of players, suggesting directions of future research in investigating the role that outside factors may have on knowledge and perception of concussion.

DOI10.1080/00913847.2017.1345569
Alternate JournalPhys Sportsmed
PubMed ID28636426
Faculty Reference: 
Anna Waterbrook, MD, FACEP